Wind at it's back side

Started by 1snafu, July 11, 2022, 10:42:34 AM

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1snafu


1snafu


1snafu

I'm inserting the pic address

& it isn't posting. ugh

1snafu


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pitw

I say what I think not think what I say.

1snafu

Thanks for the posting help. I'm not sure why it wouldn't post.

I post bedded canine pics. To mainly illustrate they have the wind at their backside.  I believe a hunter may get away with walking into an area of flat land w/groundcover. With the (wind in his/her face). However, on hilly terrain, any self respecting coyote up ahead of that hunter. Stands an excellent chance of being busted from long range. As "most" bedded down coyotes & Red Fox will face an angled down wind direction.

I have after spotting a sleeper from long range. Stalked in from a down-wind angle. Only because I could not gain access to other adjoining land. When I do stalk in with the wind in my face on hilly terrain. I use whatever hills & or ground cover. To conceal me in the way in. Coyotes specifically are very light sleepers. I consider them as "resting" vs actually sleeping. Because often while bedded down. They will raise their head & pan around 180+. Transient/nomadic coyotes will often pan 360. It's as IF...they are expecting some hunter wanting to put the thump on them. I've stalked many a hundreds of them. Easier said than done. If a hunter expects to get within shotgun range.

Closest I've been to a sleeper coyote was less than 50'(maybe 30ish?). Red Fox around 10'. Both bedded down on deep fluff snow.

1snafu

In a perfect World. Whether I'm stalking in on a sleeper or walking in an area to call. I prefer the 10:00 or 2:00 angle. Because that puts me cross-wind & angled up-wind from the sleeper or where I believe a coyote may be. The only hurdle I need to overcome then is, not being heard.

I do not underestimate a coyotes hearing ability. As it is top of the line imo. So whether calling or stalking. I stealth in slow & step lightly. Watching/listening to each foot step before putting my whole body weight on that step. I take no chances of being heard. Over cautious I suppose to some of you? But I strive not being heard. I've taken a few callers spot/stalking & they tromp into an area like cattle heading towards a feeder. They remain clueless about the coyotes abilities. Duh

Okanagan

In 2009 I posted a parrallel story about a stalk on 3 mule deer that were bedded in a stubble field with backs to wind while they watched in front of them downwind. Link to that story below, first posted Sept. 27, 2009

http://forum.finsandfur.net/index.php?topic=10025.0

 The young bowhunter did the best stalk I've ever seen in my life and killed a big 5x7 mule deer buck at 11 yards.
 


 

1snafu

Whitetails also do it here in my hunt area. A hunter can learn an edge on a critter just by observing.

1snafu

I know a few callers in my area. Both subscribe walking into an area with the wind in their face. On hilly terrain that is a fools game. Soon as they breach the last hill between them & a canine up ahead on the next hillside. Game over

Dumbassery begats dumbassery. Stupid whipper snappers. haha