Author Topic: Train.  (Read 1643 times)

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Offline pitw

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Train.
« on: January 06, 2016, 10:04:06 PM »
I say what I think not think what I say.

Offline Hawks Feather

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Re: Train.
« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2016, 10:21:59 PM »
I guess as long as you don't want to eat them it should work.

Jerry

Offline pitw

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Re: Train.
« Reply #2 on: January 06, 2016, 11:02:55 PM »
Indians chased them over cliffs. :wo:
I say what I think not think what I say.

Offline FinsnFur

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Re: Train.
« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2016, 05:12:16 AM »
Wow :huh:
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Offline Okanagan

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Re: Train.
« Reply #4 on: January 07, 2016, 11:40:46 AM »
Hate to see that.  Animals are smart enough to gather and even bed down on the snow free track, and too stupid to know better. 

When the snow is deep in the national parks of the Canadian Rockies, the only place free of snow is river water, the TransCanada highway and the railroad track.    Moose usually try to outrun the train.  I watched a coyote try to outrun a train in snow over six feet deep along the sides.  He finally made a wild leap out of the way and totally disappeared as he dived to one side of the tracks into deep powder snow.

In Wyoming during a ground blizzard of blowing snow rather than falling snow, a big rig truck ahead of us killed several mule deer as a herd crossed the road, at least seven dead deer if my memory is right.  One midnight a few years ago as I drove over a pass on Highway 3 just north of the US border along Idaho or Montana, a blinding heavy snow was falling as I snaked down the west side where the road is a shelf cut into a rock wall of mountain.  Suddenly a herd of elk with a layer of camo snow on their backs was filling the road ahead of me, crossing downhill as they followed a steep draw down the mountain face.  I wasn't going very fast but started sliding on fresh snow when I touched the brakes, and managed to slither and slalom between elk and never hit a one though the rump of one brushed the side of my rig.