Author Topic: Fox bedded in open downwind of low ridge as Snafu said  (Read 376 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Okanagan

  • Silver Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2990
Fox bedded in open downwind of low ridge as Snafu said
« on: March 07, 2018, 07:06:48 AM »
Snafu has written about how foxes and coyotes bed down in the open downwind of cover or a ridgeline.  I just got back from Wyoming where I saw a fox do exactly that.  He lay downwind of a low ridge with his back to the wind while he watched downwind.  When I saw the fox and noted the wind and slope of ground, I thought of what you'd written, Snafu.  Below is a quote from your post on Oct. 1 2016.

Both coyotes & Red Fox, prefer to spend the majority of their time. On the down-wind side of cover & or a ridgeline/ground structure for example. They prefer those areas because they are wind-break areas. I have observed thousands of coyotes & hundred of Red Fox in their natural settings. The down-wind areas are where they'll be. 

« Last Edit: March 07, 2018, 08:41:12 AM by Okanagan »

Offline KySongDog

  • Platinum Membership
  • *
  • Posts: 7271
Re: Fox bedded in open downwind of low ridge as Snafu said
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2018, 02:38:11 PM »
I've seen deer do the same thing.  They will bed with their nose pointed downwind.  They look where they cannot smell.   Anything coming from upwind and behind them will be picked up by their nose.


Offline JohnP

  • Silver Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2874
Re: Fox bedded in open downwind of low ridge as Snafu said
« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2018, 01:43:46 PM »
I think you'll find that is true of most critters.
When they come for mine they better bring theirs

Offline Okanagan

  • Silver Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2990
Re: Fox bedded in open downwind of low ridge as Snafu said
« Reply #3 on: March 14, 2018, 03:16:44 PM »
I think you'll find that is true of most critters.

Makes sense.

As a corollary I have learned from tracking them that mule deer and moose in forest will hook back and bed downwind of their back trail, especially on a rise of ground with some cover where they can see and smell anything following their tracks.  When tracking such critters in flattish or rolling terrain, I have tried leaving the tracks and stalking every rise on the downwind side.  Slow, tiring, rewarding.  I have jumped critters and had some fun but never have killed one that way, though a better hunter would.  By the time a follower tracks the critter to the place where it reversed course, it is long gone.  The bedded critter smelled and probably saw the pursuer as he tracked past, and sneaked away. 

When one of these animals has been heading one general direction and then starts to wander, it often means that he is looking for a place to bed downwind of his back trail.  That spot may already be too late, but it is worth looking around and stalking any rise or cover that is just ahead on the downwind side of the animal's direction of travel.


Offline snafu

  • Hard Core FnF'r
  • *****
  • Posts: 660
  • FinsandFur member
Re: Fox bedded in open downwind of low ridge as Snafu said
« Reply #4 on: April 03, 2018, 05:09:35 PM »
Snafu has written about how foxes and coyotes bed down in the open downwind of cover or a ridgeline.  I just got back from Wyoming where I saw a fox do exactly that.  He lay downwind of a low ridge with his back to the wind while he watched downwind.  When I saw the fox and noted the wind and slope of ground, I thought of what you'd written, Snafu.  Below is a quote from your post on Oct. 1 2016.

Both coyotes & Red Fox, prefer to spend the majority of their time. On the down-wind side of cover & or a ridgeline/ground structure for example. They prefer those areas because they are wind-break areas. I have observed thousands of coyotes & hundred of Red Fox in their natural settings. The down-wind areas are where they'll be. 



True in most instances, high 90's % I'd say. Also the higher the wind. The more in alignment their muzzle/eyes will be facing to their down-wind. I believe canines have a peripheral vision of around 220 degrees +/-. I use the (rule of thumb) when sneaking up on one. If...I can not see any part of their eye. Then they do not see me. As is mentioned, deer do also for the most part. But will tolerate wind on their face more so than do the canines.
"Smartest man, knows but a grain of sand. In the desert of truth"