Author Topic: knot for fly to tippet  (Read 1775 times)

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Offline Hawks Feather

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Re: knot for fly to tippet
« Reply #20 on: July 24, 2018, 02:38:25 PM »
I have never really taken the time to learn how to throw flies.  Years ago I too, a couple hour class at L.L.Bean's main store. We went out to a couple of strips of water (no fish) and tied a small piece of pipe cleaner on the line to represent a fly.  I got pretty good - not at throwing the pipe cleaner fly, but at popping those suckers off.   :rolleye: While I am not sure I think the guy giving the lessons was about ready to tell me to stick to rifles.

Jerry

Offline nastygunz

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Re: knot for fly to tippet
« Reply #21 on: July 24, 2018, 03:31:22 PM »
 I have Bull whipped a few fly cast in my day ha ha.

Offline Okanagan

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Re: knot for fly to tippet
« Reply #22 on: July 24, 2018, 03:56:28 PM »
Hawk, you shoulda seen the despair in the only instructor who ever gave me skiing lessons.

Hey, Nasty, thanks for the link to Big Fly.  Wide selection of fly patterns compared to other fly selling sites, and great prices.  I am making up a list to order but man those internet fly outfits sure limit the sizes on most flies to dinky stuff.

They have a dry fly called a cinnamon sedge that looks deadly if fished in one of our sedge hatches, except that the biggest they sell is size #12.  I'd like it in #6.  Our sedges are kind of a medium size moth.  From reading their site, it looks like what people in BC call sedges is what the US people call caddis. 

I could pick up a few patterns I want in in larger sizes in the steelhead/salmon section but they are way more expensive, might as well buy them locally.

You all are a baaaad influence.  I am debating whether to drive all the way five hours back up there to go another round with the big brook trout in the moose pond.  I should wait till October and have a deer tag in my pocket, or November with a moose tag.  Next time I will take a skillet along to the shoreline. 



Offline nastygunz

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Re: knot for fly to tippet
« Reply #23 on: July 24, 2018, 04:52:25 PM »
" I should wait till October and have a deer tag in my pocket, or November with a moose tag ".

He who hesitates is lost.

Time (and trout) waits for no man.

Never put off until October what you can do in July.

 :innocentwhistle: :innocentwhistle: :yoyo:

Offline nastygunz

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Re: knot for fly to tippet
« Reply #24 on: July 24, 2018, 05:07:46 PM »
 This is an article I wrote about a trout from long ago and it reminds me of Okanagans trout that he is thinking about, trout do that to a man:


TRUE STORY !
------------------
THE KING TROUT

Memories, like a short film or snapshot in your head, some good some bad. I have many memories of my experiences as an outdoorsman and fly fishermen. I carry a camera in my fishing vest to capture some of the scenes I encounter as I am stalking the elusive trout, mostly to share my experiences with family and friends.

But the most vivid and vibrant pictures I have I carry around in my head, and try to share them with people through my writing. Memories that range from early childhood to the present.. One of my earliest and clearest memories was of the little spring fed brook behind our cabin in Groton, Vermont.

It came from an underground spring across the power line behind the cabin, bubbling up through a rich layer of coal black silt that looked like black velvet, with a sprinkling of bone white sand disgorged from the underground source of the water. The brook draining out of the spring hole averages about 1 to 3 feet wide and at its deepest spots no more then 2 feet deep, its water ice cold enough to numb your hands and turn them bright red.

It runs through a variety of terrain as it crosses the power line which is heavily covered in blackberry bushes and other cut over area growth then reaches the other side of the power line and sluices down between to big, wet, moss and lichen encrusted boulders forming a perfect natural spigot where we used to fill our water jugs as kids. Once when I was going to fetch water I saw 2 big Brook Trout laying half in and half out of the water by the boulders as they spawned, their brilliant colors slick and wet, and neon, like a new oil painting.

From there it runs down through a pine forest, meandering and weaving its way between boulders and large pine trees until it infiltrates a thick, dark damp cedar forest. After running its course for a tumbling, gurgling mile or so, it reaches its end destination, a small very dense combination meadow and cedar swamp. I did not know it until I grew up and became “educated” but the swamp is a wetland with an amazing variety of wildlife.

As a kid it was a swamp full of turtles and frogs and rabbits and ducks. Best of all it was also full of trout. There are a series of small channels running through the swamp and over the years of grass growing up then falling over the channels they have almost become underwater tunnels. We used to quietly walk up to the channels and using our hands gently make holes in the grass so we could drop a worm down in the water of the tunnel.

When we dropped our baited hooks down into the tunnel we would often have instant strikes from brook trout that were very unusual as they were a dark purplish black from living in the tunnels. There were a lot of them and sometimes they grew to significant sizes. The same swamp was a favorite hotspot for running our beagles rabbit hunting in the winter time and always a good bet for some partridge during bird season.

One of my funniest and favorite memories of the brook is when I was 6 years old I was fishing the brook with my standard issue willow branch and about 5 feet of line. I dropped my worm into a hole where the brook ran between 2 huge dark gnarled cedar trees making a waterfall and a small deep dark hole under their roots and got an instant bite and reared back like The Mad Fishermen, Charlie Moore on a 12 pound largemouth.

The result of this expeditious application of force was the biggest Brook Trout I have ever seen to date from the brook came flopping up onto the bank and as I stood there in shock, flopped right back down into the hole whence he came from. It all happened so fast I did not even have time to try the desperate fishermen's dive after the trophy, that every fishermen has tried at one time or another. After that experience I got up every morning before school and tried the lunker hole and every night bee lined there to try my hand at capturing the King Trout, with no luck at all, not even a nibble.

About a week after the initial engagement between the King Trout and I, I went back down to the brook to go fishing on a nice Saturday morning with my older sister Dawn. To this day I don't know why she went as she never fished or hunted and doesn't till this day. As we were fishing our way down the brook in the initial moments I was not watching her, as I considered her a non-threat for competition for the best fishing holes, unlike my brothers who were hostile, agile, and mobile.

I was fishing and focused on the hole when all of a sudden I heard a scream and looked up and Dawn was at the lunker hole and had pulled the King Trout out of his hole and he was flopping on the bank as she threw her pole down on the ground and was screaming and crying Jimmy! Jimmy!. I dropped my pole and sprinted over to the hole just as the King Trout flopped back into the hole, again, like an instant replay of the first time I hooked him.

I think I yelled at her at the time even though she was older then me and used to beat me up pretty regularly at the time. I tried that hole for many years afterwards and never again saw or hooked the King Trout. And I have always had those memories, of the King Trout flopping on the bank, twice, and my sister screaming, irreplaceable and priceless, and 20 years later I still catch beautiful native Brook Trout out of the brook, and the very same hole I almost caught the King Trout out of. In an odd way I think I know how the old fishermen in the Hemingway Book “The Old Man and the Sea” felt.

When I was a kid I obsessed about catching the King Trout, now that I am older, I am glad I never did catch him, because now he lives forever in my mind.

Offline Okanagan

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Re: knot for fly to tippet
« Reply #25 on: July 24, 2018, 08:30:31 PM »
GREAT story!  Thanks!


Offline nastygunz

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Re: knot for fly to tippet
« Reply #26 on: July 24, 2018, 09:07:37 PM »
Can you tell I love trout? :innocentwhistle:😇

Offline FinsnFur

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Re: knot for fly to tippet
« Reply #27 on: July 24, 2018, 10:06:37 PM »
No we cant.  :laf: :alscalls:

I'm still laughing at Jerrys post..."popping those suckers off" :laugh2:
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Offline weedwalker

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Re: knot for fly to tippet
« Reply #28 on: September 28, 2018, 09:14:39 AM »
I tie my leaders onto my fly line with a nail knot. And my leaders are just stepped down weights of mono. On my 4wt rod, I start with about 2 1/2' of 20# mono, then about 2 1/2' of 10# mono, then about 4' of either 6# or 4# flourocarbon line for my tippet, depending on what I'm fishing for. Except for the nail knot to the fly line, all the other lines are joined by a double surgeons loop knot, which is just a double overhand loop knot. I've never had a loop knot break.
My 6wt rod I step down my leaders with 30# mono, 20# mono, 10# flourocabon, then maybe 6# flourocaron.
My 8wt rod, 30# mono, 20# mono, 15# mono. Mostly for muskie or bigger smallmouth flies.
« Last Edit: September 28, 2018, 09:20:04 AM by weedwalker »

Offline nastygunz

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Re: knot for fly to tippet
« Reply #29 on: September 28, 2018, 05:02:45 PM »
I just buy tapered leaders, I'm lazy 😇

Offline weedwalker

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Re: knot for fly to tippet
« Reply #30 on: September 29, 2018, 05:56:17 PM »
I just buy tapered leaders, I'm lazy 😇

 :biggrin: I've got 1000s of yards of all sizes line. I'm too cheap to buy what I can make.

Offline nastygunz

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Re: knot for fly to tippet
« Reply #31 on: September 29, 2018, 06:40:30 PM »
 If I am fishing the Brooks up in Vermont for native brookies with my 6 foot 2 weight fly rod I skip a tapered leader and just go directly from the fly line to about 3 feet of 2 to 4 pound flurocarbon.

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« Last Edit: September 29, 2018, 06:45:46 PM by nastygunz »

Offline Okanagan

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Re: knot for fly to tippet
« Reply #32 on: September 30, 2018, 08:27:35 AM »
FWIW I figured out how to tie a Palomar knot by threading the end of the leader through the hook eye rather than by the usual way of pushing the doubled end of the line through.  It works on small flies and I used it on my recent Yukon safari. Very small knot that is strong.


Offline centerfire_223

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Re: knot for fly to tippet
« Reply #33 on: October 01, 2018, 06:13:50 AM »
I use a double Davie knot when I am tying small size line. I use the same knot for my bass fishing size lines to but I throw in 5 wraps instead of 2. It's a super strong knot.
Ronnie Cannon

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Offline nastygunz

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Re: knot for fly to tippet
« Reply #34 on: October 03, 2018, 05:52:03 PM »
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