Author Topic: What is this? 10-10  (Read 127 times)

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Offline remrogers

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What is this? 10-10
« on: October 10, 2018, 09:57:16 AM »

Offline pitw

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Re: What is this? 10-10
« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2018, 10:02:58 AM »
A hand above a plant?
I say what I think not think what I say.

Offline slagmaker

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Re: What is this? 10-10
« Reply #2 on: October 10, 2018, 10:14:10 AM »
Feed me Seymore!!
Don't bring shame to our sport.

He died for dipshits too.

Offline nastygunz

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Re: What is this? 10-10
« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2018, 11:46:32 AM »
 It  appears to be a female Caucasian hand with an upper body garment consisting of a cotton polyester blend. Oh, and the plant:

Trillium underwoodii
Common Names: purple toadshade,sweet Betsy,wake robin
Family: Melanthiac

Trilliums (from the Latin for "three") have all their parts in threes: three "leaves" (actually bracts), three sepals, three petals, three stigmas on the pistil, and six stamens. Trilliums have a single 8-12 in (20.3-25.4 cm) stem (technically a peduncle) that arises from a perennial rhizome and bears a single whorl of three leaflike bracts, and just above them, a single flower. One of the most common and widespread trilliums in the southeastern US is T. cuneatum, or purple toadshade. Most authorities recognize T. underwoodii as a distinct, but closely related species. The two are very similar and their ranges are adjoining without overlapping, so we treat them together. The "leaves" of purple toadshade are mottled dark and light green, with most of the light green down the center. The leaves are 2-4 in (5.1-10.2 cm) long and droop down almost to the ground. The greenish-maroon (sometimes brown or yellow) flower petals stand straight up and never open fully. The flowers have a peculiar spicy fragrance that some find unappealing. Purple toadshade blooms in very early spring.

Location
Purple toadshade occurs in the southeast US from North Carolina and Kentucky to north Florida and Mississippi. T. underwoodii is restricted to north Florida and adjacent Alabama and Georgia. Purple toadshade grows in rich, calcareous woods and slope forests, in the shade of hardwoods like American beech (Fagus grandiflora), southern magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora), and various oaks and hickories.

Offline remrogers

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Re: What is this? 10-10
« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2018, 11:56:41 PM »
Nastygunz got this one correct. Happens it was in Alabama.

Offline FinsnFur

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Re: What is this? 10-10
« Reply #5 on: October 11, 2018, 08:57:37 PM »
I thought Barry nailed it  :bowingsmilie: :alscalls: :alscalls:
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Offline nastygunz

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Re: What is this? 10-10
« Reply #6 on: October 11, 2018, 10:14:34 PM »
+1  :innocentwhistle: