Author Topic: Ole Mossyback!  (Read 958 times)

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Offline nastygunz

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Ole Mossyback!
« on: November 30, 2020, 02:10:52 PM »
Big ole Maine buck!  I think he might have crossbred with a moose ?.... :biggrin:

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Offline slagmaker

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Re: Ole Mossyback!
« Reply #1 on: November 30, 2020, 11:42:23 PM »
WOW!! Those are awesome antlers.
Don't bring shame to our sport.

He died for dipshits too.

Offline remrogers

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Re: Ole Mossyback!
« Reply #2 on: November 30, 2020, 11:42:58 PM »
You might be correct.

Offline Okanagan

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Re: Ole Mossyback!
« Reply #3 on: December 01, 2020, 02:49:09 PM »
What a buck!  I love webbing on deer antlers and this one is extreme!


Offline nastygunz

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Re: Ole Mossyback!
« Reply #4 on: December 01, 2020, 04:32:34 PM »
 Dark colored Deer and antlers.  They don't get much sun living in the Big Woods.

Offline JohnP

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Re: Ole Mossyback!
« Reply #5 on: December 08, 2020, 10:34:44 AM »
All I see is image not found.
When they come for mine they better bring theirs

Offline FinsnFur

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Re: Ole Mossyback!
« Reply #6 on: December 13, 2020, 10:21:55 AM »
Thats the moss John  :laf:
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Offline nastygunz

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Re: Ole Mossyback!
« Reply #7 on: December 13, 2020, 06:26:52 PM »
 You don't have any ghost bucks up there where you live?  I think that photo post site that I use I cleaned out a bunch of photographs from there and I think that deleted it. Ill see if I can repost it Sir!

Offline nastygunz

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Re: Ole Mossyback!
« Reply #8 on: December 13, 2020, 06:35:17 PM »
The North Maine Woods (Big Woods) is the northern geographic area of the state of Maine in the United States. The thinly populated region is overseen by a combination of private individual and private industrial owners and state government agencies, and is divided into 155 unincorporated townships within the NMW management area.There are no towns or paved roads.

The region covers more than 3.5 million acres (14,000 km2) of forest land.

Interesting stuff!

Early 19th century logging of the North Maine woods employed native Maliseet, English settlers from the Atlantic coast, French Canadians from the Saint Lawrence River valley, and some unskilled laborers recruited from large eastern cities. Unique mythology evolved in the remote logging camps from hazing new employees or attempts by competing groups to dominate the resource extraction labor market. Two birds held special significance. The relatively tame gray jays would follow loggers through the woods in the hope of stealing unwatched food, but were not harmed because they were believed to be the spirits of deceased woodsmen. Some French Canadians would quit work if a white owl was seen flying from a tree they were felling, for they believed it was a ghost who would haunt them unless they left that part of the woods.

Mythical creatures of the north woods:[11]

Razor-shins was an immortal humanoid with sharp shin bones and a thirst for liquor in the prohibition state of Maine. New employees were encouraged to leave a jug of Bangor whisky outside of the camp door on the night of the full moon. If razor-shins emptied the jug by morning, he might use his razor-sharp shinbones to fell a tree for the new man. But there were tales of new employees caught in the woods by razor-shins and scalped or otherwise mutilated after failing to offer the customary tribute.
Will-am-alones were squirrel-like creatures said to roll poisonous lichen into small balls and drop them onto the eyelids or into the ears of sleeping men. The lichen balls were reputed to cause headaches and visual hallucinations the following day. The effects seemed most evident among men who had consumed illegal liquor.
Windigo (or "Indian devil") was described as a huge, shadowy humanoid with a voice like the moaning of the wind through the pine boughs, but known only by his tracks through the snow. Each footprint was 24 inches (61 cm) long and resembled a snowshoe imprint with a red spot in the center where blood had oozed through a hole in his moccasin. Some feared to cross his tracks and claimed looking upon Windigo would seal their doom.
Ding-ball was a cougar whose last tail joint was ball-shaped and bare of hair and flesh. Ding-ball was fond of human flesh and would sing with a human voice to lure the incautious out of their cabins at night where it waited in the darkness to crack their skulls with its tail.